What is Pro-Growth Bias?

Pro-Growth Bias is reflected in the media by the stories and words chosen, which hint and often trumpet that economic, population, and consumption growth is good and essential. We're here to expose the bias and encourage more balanced and thoughtful journalism. Here you can vote, discuss, and even post stories exemplifying the bias.

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Economy Sizzles; Media Celebrate Return to Robust Destruction This morning the United States Department of Commerce released its advanced estimate of 2nd quarter National Income and Product Accounts – GDP. An annualized growth rate of about 3% was widely anticipated, so the 4 percent figure reported today will undoubtedly be celebrated – by the White House, growth profiteers counting their money, growth propheteers on the business news networks, and economic reporters. All will be celebrating a number which, in truth, measures how fast the U.S. is liquidating the planet of nonrenewable resources, how fast we’re replacing wildlife habitat and farms with mcmansions on cul-de-sacs, and how much CO2 we’re...
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The Impossibility of Growth George Monbiot is no stranger to the Wall of Fame but this latest piece from his website is just epic. The Impossibility of Growth obviously caught our eye and those of many other organizations. The article has been making the rounds via social media and we couldn’t be more pleased. But we also wanted to give it more attention and bring it to you in case you missed it. The opening two paragraphs hit the reader like a hammer. He turns to Jeremy Grantham for a quick calculation to demonstrate what a steady growth rate of possessions since 3030BC would look...
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Economic Growth Slows to a Crawl in First Quarter Here is another prime example of reporting as usual from the LA Times. The gist: The economy is growing but not fast enough. Don Lee writes, “The Commerce Department said Wednesday that the economy expanded at a mere 0.1% annual pace in the first three months of the year, one of the weakest rates of growth in the nearly 5-year-old recovery.” Nothing but depressing news as exemplified by words like “mere” and “weakest”. We’re still wondering where it’s set in stone that the economy has to be constantly growing for all to be right in the world. But somehow that idea...
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Success of Marine Protected Areas Depends on These 5 Things This statement is just another example of an environmental writer who can't/won't face the fact that we need a population policy: "We need more areas like Cocos Island, which can provide a refuge for marine life and generate benefits from tourism activities. However, we also need areas that can provide other types of benefits to people — food from fishing, coastal protection, carbon storage, coastal livelihoods and the other services people get from the ocean." Environmentalism won't help without a human population policy. Resource use has gone too far not to have one if marine life is to recover from overfishing....
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China One-Child Policy Reform: More Impact On Consumption Than Reversing Aging Demographic China’s decision last November to ease its one-child policy generated disappointingly myopic news coverage. A particularly clueless report by pro-growth BloombergTV made our Wall of Shame back then. This more recent story at International Business Times by Sophie Song earns the shame today. It got my attention by positioning the possibility of increased consumption as good news: “Beijing’s one-child policy reform…won’t be sufficient to reverse the aging of China’s population, but could benefit consumption patterns, a new report says.” Song reports the change is too little, too late, “to address the long-term challenge of China’s rapidly aging demographics.” There is no...
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