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This statement is just another example of an environmental writer who can't/won't face the fact that we need a population policy: "We need more areas like Cocos Island, which can provide a refuge for marine life and generate benefits from tourism activities. However, we also need areas that can provide other types of benefits to people — food from fishing, coastal protection, carbon storage, coastal livelihoods and the other services people get from the ocean." Environmentalism won't help without a human population policy. Resource use has gone too far not to have one if marine life is to recover from overfishing. And that's just this example. There are plenty more.http://blog.conservation.org/2014/02/success-of-marine-protected-areas-depends-on-these-5-things/...
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China’s decision last November to ease its one-child policy generated disappointingly myopic news coverage. A particularly clueless report by pro-growth BloombergTV made our Wall of Shame back then. This more recent story at International Business Times by Sophie Song earns the shame today. It got my attention by positioning the possibility of increased consumption as good news: “Beijing’s one-child policy reform…won’t be sufficient to reverse the aging of China’s population, but could benefit consumption patterns, a new report says.” Song reports the change is too little, too late, “to address the long-term challenge of China’s rapidly aging demographics.” There is no mention of the benefits of population stabilization or decline for...
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Misdemeanor
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Felony

Posted by on in Wall of Fame

I’m deviating a bit from our mission of encouraging more accurate reporting about economic and population growth in the mainstream media, to applaud a bit of street theater and video from Melbourne, Australia. "Keeping up with the Joneses" is a well-worn phrase describing our tendency to assess self-worth by comparing our possessions with those of our neighbors, friends, colleagues. A luxury car, trophy house, designer clothes, latest iPad are all among “the trappings of success,” which signal to our peers that we are successful. It makes sense, when you don’t think about it. Inviting us to think about it is exactly what The New Joneses Project was all about (it took...
How much fame?
Marginal
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Outstanding
Finally! Some satisfaction in our quest for mainstream media attention to the unsustainability of ever-increasing Black Friday shopping. Marc Gunther’s column in the UK Guardian charts some bold, new territory for big media:  “When I got the winter Patagonia catalog in the mail, I was delighted to read an essay by Bob Massie called The Parable of the Iron Pan. Massie, an ordained minister, longtime environmentalist and president of the New Economics Institute writes about a 12-inch cast iron frying pan that he bought for $2 years ago at an estate sale. He reckons that the pan was 90 years old then, and that he has cooked with it for another...
How much fame?
Marginal
6
Outstanding
Ordinarily we try to honor news media on the Wall of Fame, for exemplary reporting and commentary on growth issues. In the case of the upcoming Black Friday shopapalooza, we’ve been unable to find ANY Black Friday reports or commentary in the news media that even hint at the ecosystem damage wrought by an economy hooked on increasing consumption. Democracy Now’s Wall of Fame piece yesterday was close, but it was not in the context of Black Friday. So, we must turn to the blogs for wisdom on this subject. Thank heaven for folks like Susan Rubin and Charles Hugh Smith. (Full disclosure here: In his blog, Have a Merry DeGrowth...
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Marginal
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Outstanding
The unsustainability of perpetual economic growth is a topic more taboo than world overpopulation. It’s a very rare day we can honor a news broadcast for reporting on the perils of economic growth. Therefore I’m offering a standing ovation to Amy Goodman and Democracy Now for last week’s interview with climate scientists Keven Anderson and Alice Bows-Larkin. Anderson and Bows-Larkin deserve a round of applause themselves. “We turn now to a pair of climate scientists who are calling for what some may view as a shocking solution to the climate crisis: a rethinking of the economic order in the United States and other industrialized nations.” What really stands out about this...
How much fame?
Marginal
5
Outstanding


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