What is Pro-Growth Bias?

Pro-Growth Bias is reflected in the media by the stories and words chosen, which hint and often trumpet that economic, population, and consumption growth is good and essential. We're here to expose the bias and encourage more balanced and thoughtful journalism. Here you can vote, discuss, and even post stories exemplifying the bias.

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Dave Gardner

Dave Gardner

Dave is the director of the documentary GrowthBusters: Hooked on Growth. Dave is also president of Citizen-Powered Media, a non-profit working to find the cure to our society's growth addiction. Growth Bias Busted is one of the projects of Citizen-Powered Media's ongoing GrowthBusters public education program.

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Sorry, Peter Pan - Heinberg Wins the Week Severely tilted economic reporting by the Associated Press dominated our Wall of Shame this week, but we got a much-needed breath of fresh air yesterday on the Wall of Fame. Richard Heinberg’s Two Realities won the week’s voting, and was shared and liked quite a bit on facebook. One commenter there even wrote: “I want to be Richard Heinberg when I grow up.” We all need to do some growing up, and Heinberg’s essay offers just the truth serum to get that ball rolling. If you missed it yesterday, you’ll want to check it out. Share it with any billionaires you know....
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Heinberg: Physical Reality vs. Political Reality Richard Heinberg has a way with words. Today I’d like to honor him on the Wall of Fame for his recent essay, Two Realities, published by the Post Carbon Institute. If you’re not familiar with Richard, his bona fides include a long history of research and authorship. He is a respected authority on energy and economics. His regularly published Museletter never disappoints. You can explore his books and Museletter here. After a slew of disappointing coverage of growth issues keeping us on the Wall of Shame, it's a pleasure to share and celebrate Heinberg's work. This piece accurately sums up the...
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Economy Sizzles; Media Celebrate Return to Robust Destruction This morning the United States Department of Commerce released its advanced estimate of 2nd quarter National Income and Product Accounts – GDP. An annualized growth rate of about 3% was widely anticipated, so the 4 percent figure reported today will undoubtedly be celebrated – by the White House, growth profiteers counting their money, growth propheteers on the business news networks, and economic reporters. All will be celebrating a number which, in truth, measures how fast the U.S. is liquidating the planet of nonrenewable resources, how fast we’re replacing wildlife habitat and farms with mcmansions on cul-de-sacs, and how much CO2 we’re...
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Colorado River Day: Major Fail by Media and Conservationists Last Friday was Colorado River Day, as I was reminded by an email from Save the Colorado. So I have some interesting observations on the small flurry of media coverage, particularly with the recent news that Lake Mead hit a record low level (39% of capacity) this summer. According to the Colorado River Day website, “This is a day on which people come together across divides in support of maintaining a sustainable Colorado River.” Yet as I perused a litany of opinion pieces and news stories, I found no mention of the unsustainable behavior that, unchanged, renders the myriad plans to “save...
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AP Trifecta of Pro-Growth Bias in Reporting Associated Press offered so much judgment in recent days that more spending, consumption and economic growth are desirable, I’m having to spotlight three stories at once here on the Wall of Shame: In New US Home Sales Plunge 8.1% In June, there is a clear assumption that building more houses is an unalloyed good. A drop in the number of new houses sold is reported as, “a sign that real estate continues to be a weak spot in the economy.” Construction and sale of more houses would apparently create a “stronger” economy. What are the criteria the reporter, analysts and policymakers...
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