What is Pro-Growth Bias?

Pro-Growth Bias is reflected in the media by the stories and words chosen, which hint and often trumpet that economic, population, and consumption growth is good and essential. We're here to expose the bias and encourage more balanced and thoughtful journalism. Here you can vote, discuss, and even post stories exemplifying the bias.

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What is below is "Grist Daily" from July 15, 2014. Look at these stories. To me, probably to most of us, the common connection -- and causal factor -- is so obvious and so important.   Why do they miss it? What would it take? Can we have some impact or influence to getting the media to see and point out the connections?        Grist Daily Jul 15, 2014 View in browser     America's largest reservoir is hitting new record lows every day The drought and overuse of Colorado River water has led to an epic decline in water...
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Hard to Love These World Population Day Bombs I conclude my review of media coverage of last Friday’s observance of World Population Day with a few examples worthy of the most serious shame. These are commentaries and videos that completely ignore very real and mounting evidence that the world is already overpopulated at 7.2 billion. They promote cranking up the baby factories with total disregard for the very finite limits of Spaceship Earth. I would compare it to the owner of a Chuck e Cheese (pizza and games for kids) franchise doing everything in his power to pack thousands of customers into a restaurant the fire marshal specifies can hold 200....
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A Few Shining Examples in World Population Day Coverage This week I’m sharing my observations of media coverage for last Friday’s observation of World Population Day. The volume and tone of the public conversation on this one day of the year might give us an indication of how honest we’re being with ourselves about the overpopulated state of the world. After all, the stories we tell ourselves help define our culture. British environmentalist Jonathan Porritt summed it up in his blog yesterday: “…given that we can’t really have World Population Day every day for 365 days of the year, I guess one day out of 365 is marginally better than...
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UN Cleverly Hides Real Purpose of World Population Day Friday was World Population Day, as declared by the United Nations and observed every year on July 11. I’m thinking that’s an excellent time to improve the population-literacy of the world. Journalists might actually be interested in writing about the state of the world’s population. I watched the media coverage pretty closely last week for items about World Population Day. While humankind’s overabundance on the planet is a crisis that should be reported on a regular basis, at the very least it should be in the spotlight on July 11. It’s clear there was a significant increase in media activity this...
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Does Inequality Render Overpopulation a Non-Issue? Of Course Not Our countdown to World Population Day July 11 continues. At Growth Bias Busted we are constantly playing whack-a-mole with efforts to dissuade us all from addressing overpopulation and instead focus on overconsumption. Today’s recipient of shame gets a whack for that reason. World Population Day – Inequity Is The Problem Not Population by Stellenbosch University psychology Professor Mark Tomlinson does a major disservice when it poo poos overpopulation as part of our sustainability challenge: “It has never been about over population but rather a system designed to encourage rampant consumerism, to reward greed, and to enable the global elite to amass...
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